Dance

Saoirse Irish Dance Troupe
Saoirse Irish Dance Troupe

photo credit: Jos Dielis some rights reserved.

Popular Selections from O’Neill’s Dance Music of Ireland double jigs; single jigs; hop or slip jigs; reels ; hornpipes and long dances, arranged by Selena A. O’Neill. Published by Request of The Gaelic Junior Dancing Clubs of Chicago, USA. Based on the works of Captain Francis O’Neill. –archive.org

The history of Irish Dance The early history of Irish dance reveals a constant shifting of population through migration and invasions. Each of these peoples brought their preferred types of dance and music. There are only vague references to the early history of Irish dancing, but there is evidence that among its first practitioners were the Druids, who danced in religious rituals honouring the oak tree and the sun. – Ireland’s Eye

From: rte youtube channel | Mar 11, 2011 |
Watch the trailer for the forthcoming film ‘Jig’ about the competitive world of Irish Dancing.

A Brief History of Irish Stepdancing Historical information taken from the book A handbook of Irish dances : with an essay on their origin and history by J.C. O’Keeffe and Art O’Brien. Dublin : O’Donochue, 1902. – Ireland’s Eye

Dancing costumes The dress of some of the set dancers of today reminds us of the dance at cross-roads in bygone days. The boy would normally have been a farmer’s son dressed in his Sunday best, high-buttoned waistcoat which showed off his cravat, knee breeches and brogues.Most women in Ireland would have gone barefoot until over a century ago, and this gave them a grace and bearing which today’s dancers still strive to achieve. – Ireland’s Eye

A Short History of Irish Céilí Dancing In the early part of the 1500s, the round or group dances comprised country and figure dances based on the solo reel or jig. The Rince Fada and the Rince Mór are two of those. Also The Reel of Three, The Common Reel, The Hey and The Trenchmor. These appear to have been the first of what would nowadays be described as céilí dances. Kathleen Moffatt at Cairde Rince Céilí na hÉireann (Comóradh an Chéid) Céilí Dancing

Ceol Rince na hÉireann As a collection of Irish traditional dance music Ceol Rince na hÉireann is one of the most important of its kind. The original notes and musicians’ details were in the Irish language, and here is presented for the first time a translation of these notes by Paul de Grae. – Nigel Gatherer

Ryan’s Mammoth Collection Ryan’s Mammoth Collection was published in Boston in 1883, containing 1050 reels, jigs, hornpipes, strathspeys, etc. In 1940 it was repackaged and marketed as Cole’s 1000 Fiddle Tunes (also known as The Fiddler’s Bible). Finally, in 1995 it was once again published, this time reverting to the Ryan’s Mammoth title. Whichever form it has taken, this collection has been an invaluable store of tunes for countless fiddlers and other musicians, and it is a remarkable snapshot of the repertoire of 19th century America. – Nigel Gatherer

Riverdance The Show Weaving ancient Celtic mythology and Irish history this section takes you through Riverdance in detail, revealing the meaning and motivation of each scene, its music and choreography. – Riverdance

Brooks Academy is the name of a group of set-dancers based at the premises of Na Píobairí Uilleann (The Pipers’ Club) in Dublin’s Henrietta Street. It was founded in 1982 by club members Terry and Kay Moylan and Jerry O’Reilly and Anne O’Reilly. From a beginning with just one set of dancers meeting once a week, it has grown to its present membership of around two hundred, with three classes per week. – Set dance.com

Irish Set Dances Caledonian * Clare Lancers * Sliabh Lucra * Baile Bhuirne Jig Set * Plain Set * Kerry Set * Cashel Set – Set dance.com

The Public Dancehalls Act 1935 The Public Dance Halls Act was enacted by the Irish Government in 1935.It is believed to have been a significant factor in the decline of traditional music in rural Ireland, particularly the decline of house dances and crossroads dances. – Set Dance.com

The Public Dancehalls Act 1935 AN ACT TO MAKE PROVISION FOR THE LICENSING, CONTROL, AND SUPERVISION OF PLACES USED FOR PUBLIC DANCING, AND TO MAKE PROVISION FOR OTHER MATTERS CONNECTED WITH THE MATTERS AFORESAID. [19th February, 1935.] – Irish Statute Book

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